usanimalpuzzle  logo
buttom

Finger Coral
(Porites compressa)
walrus
Description
They are composed of many individual coral polyps, which are basically anemone-like animals that secrete a skeleton. The many polyps of a colony are joined together at the base of their skeletons. These corals are generally pale brown or grey. In shallow water it resembles a knobby boulder but in deeper water it is more columnar. The branches are cylindrical and often fuse together.
Dimensions
They form some of the largest of all coral colonies, with some reaching an incredible 26 ft in height. The growth rate of porites coral is very slow, perhaps only nine millimeters a year.
Diet
Like other reef-building corals, the polyps of the finger coral have microscopic algae (zooxanthellae) living within their tissues. Through photosynthesis, these symbiotic algae produce energy-rich molecules that the coral polyps can use as nutrition.
Habitat & Range
They inhabit shallow protected reef and lagoon environments. It is the dominant coral in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii.
Conservation status
THIS SPECIES IS LISTED AS LEAST CONCERN

buttom

 

© 2014 Oswaldo Rosales
facebookicon
twittericon
pinteresticon
facebookicon
twittericon
pinteresticon